Moline, IL Pediatrician
Franklin Pediatrician
4376 7th St
Moline, IL 61265
(309) 762-0777
Pediatrician in Moline, IL Call For Finacing Options
Moline, IL Pediatrician
Franklin Pediatrician
4376 7th St
Moline, IL 61265
(309) 762-0777
Pediatrician in Moline, IL Call For Finacing Options

Posts for category: Child Care

By Franklin Pediatrics
December 07, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Sick Child   Urgent Care  

When To Take Your Child To Urgent Care

 

As a parent, you want to always do everything you can when your child is sick, but sometimes it’s hard to tell exactly how sick your child is, especially when they’re very young and can’t communicate what is bothering them. Urgent care or a trip to the hospital isn’t always needed for simple problems such as a cold, mild diarrhea, or mild fevers. So, when is it necessary to take your child to urgent care?

 

Urgent Care

 

Not all illnesses need an immediate visit with your pediatrician and it’s important for you to know what symptoms to look out for. Some symptoms that may require urgent care are:

 

  • Vomiting and diarrhea that lasts more than a few hours

  • Rash, especially with a fever

  • High fever

  • A cough or cold that lasts several days

  • Large cuts or gashes

  • Limping or the inability to move an arm or leg

  • Ear pain with fever

  • Ear drainage

  • A severe sore throat or swallowing problems

  • Sharp and persistent stomach or abdomen pain

  • Blood in urine

  • Blood in stool

  • Not being able to drink for more than 12 hours

  • Rectal temperature of 100.4 F or higher in a baby younger than 2 months old

  • Fever and vomiting

  • Any pain that gets worse and doesn’t go away after several hours

 

While many illnesses may go away with love and nurturing after a few days, there are times when it is necessary to see your pediatrician as soon as possible. If your child has any of the symptoms listed above, be sure to call your pediatrician right away to find out if it is necessary for your child to go in for an appointment so that your child can get well as soon as possible.

By Franklin Pediatrics
November 05, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Child Care   Cold   Flu  

Cold Vs. Flu

Is it a cold or the flu? When it comes to your child's health, your pediatrician provides great information and guidance on the most common illnesses plaguing families. If you are wondering about the exact nature of your child's illness and how to treat it, learn the differences between a cold and the flu and how to treat and prevent them.

What is a cold?

A cold is an upper respiratory viral infection lasting 5 to 7 days in both adults and children alike. Generally milder in intensity and shorter in duration than influenza, a cold causes:

  • Coughing
  • Sneezing
  • Watery eyes
  • A runny nose
  • Tiredness
  • Low-grade fever
The Centers for Disease Control states that most healthy children experience 8 to 10 colds by the age of two years.
 
What is the flu?
 
The flu is a much more serious viral infection. Of sudden and intense onset, the flu usually comes with:
  • High fever
  • Body aches
  • Cough
  • Extreme tiredness
  • Severe headache
  • Chills
Also, the flu lasts longer and debilitates sufferers. It carries dangerous complications, particularly with young children, the elderly, asthmatics, diabetics and those with weak immune systems.
 
Treating colds and the flu
 
Treating a cold involves rest, fluids and decongestants as needed. The onset of a cold is gradual, and so is recovery. Typically, your child will not need to visit the pediatrician if he or she has a simple cold. Simple symptom relief works well. However, high and persistent fever merits a call to your child's doctor.
 
Regarding the flu, your pediatrician may do an in-office Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test (a throat or nasal swab) to confirm the diagnosis. They may prescribe antiviral medication and instruct on how to monitor a young child's symptoms. Keep your youngster well-hydrated, and administer acetaminophen or ibuprofen as directed.
 
If flu symptoms escalate (labored respirations, severe headache, rapid heart rate or anything that seems unusual to you), take your child to the nearest hospital ER for evaluation. Pneumonia is a frequent and life-threatening complication of influenza.
 
Prevention is the best medicine
 
Protect all members of the family with these simple measures:
  1. Eat a healthy diet.
  2. Stay well-hydrated.
  3. Avoid crowds during peak cold and flu season.
  4. Keep your child home from daycare and school if he or she is sick.
  5. Teach your child to cover his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing.
  6. Don't share food or utensils, even with family members.
  7. Vaccinate against the flu. Ask your pediatrician for your child's "shot."
Trust your pediatrician
 
They work hard to prevent acute illnesses such as colds and the flu. The doctor and professional team are great resources for prevention, healing and overall well-being for your children.
By Franklin Pediatrics
October 01, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Child Care   Sports Physical   Sports  

Your child is eager to start the school year so they can participate in sports. That’s great news! Keeping your child active is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and sports can be a great experience for many children; however, it’s also important that your child’s pediatrician performs a yearly sports physical to make sure that they are ready for physical activity.

A sports physical is necessary for every child regardless of their current health. In fact, some schools make it mandatory for children to get an annual sports physical before they participate in any school sports. Regardless of whether this physical is mandatory or not, it’s highly advised that all children get a sports physical once a year.

Your child’s sports physical will involve going through their medical history and conducting a physical examination. The physical examination is pretty self-explanatory. We will check their vitals, as well as their height and weight. We will perform a vision test and evaluate everything from their heart and respiratory system to their musculoskeletal system. The goal of a physical exam is to make sure that your child hasn’t incurred any past injuries or developed any health problems that could be exacerbated by physical activity.

A pediatrician can also answer questions and provide counseling on nutrition, healthy weight loss or gain, and habits that could help your child’s physical health. Remember to bring any questions along with you.

Besides the physical examination, we will also sit down with you and your child and ask questions about their medical history. It’s important to be as detailed as possible. If it’s the first time they are having a sports physical it’s important to bring in a list of any supplements or medications (both over-the-counter or prescription) that they are currently taking.

We will ask a series of questions to find out if there are any serious or chronic health problems that run in the family, if your child has experienced any past injuries, if they’ve ever undergone surgery or been hospitalized, if they have any allergies or if they have any current disorders or illnesses. It’s important to provide as much detailed history as possible so that our pediatric team can perform a thorough and comprehensive physical.

Don’t wait until the last minute to schedule your child’s sports physical. It’s important to get your child on the books before the summer is gone and the doctor’s schedule fills up. You don’t want your child being benched during the season because they didn’t get a sports physical. Call your pediatrician today.

By Franklin Pediatrics
September 21, 2018
Category: Child Care

At Franklin Pediatrics, Dr. Nafees Khan and Dr. David Bunker offer a great preventive service: the well-child examination. Assuring parents and patients alike that health, function and growth are "on track," these routine check-ups look at a variety of physical, emotional, mental, Well Child Examfamily and lifestyle factors. Prevention of long-term problems is key and your pediatricians in Moline, IL, urges you and your family to see them regularly.

What is a well-child exam?

It's a simple, head-to-toe assessment of your child's present physical condition, growth, development and function within the school, home and social environment. Dr. Khan, Dr. Bunker and their team adhere to the well-child exam schedules published by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The check-ups begin at birth and continue through age 19.

Well-child exams offer families the opportunity to prevent disease and other factors which affect health, growth and development, to track vital signs, height, weight, puberty, reflexes, joint health, vision and hearing. Additionally, your pediatrician in Moline, IL, encourages parents and patients to raise questions and concerns about acute or chronic problems, learning, behavior, safety--in short, anything which impacts the child's well-being.

Additionally, your Moline, IL pediatrician administers vaccinations at well-child visits. The doctors follow the immunization schedule set by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and believe that vaccinations prevent serious communicable diseases and their devastating complications.

Records, shots and more

And speaking of immunizations, your doctor will update your child's health record at his or her well-child visit. This record includes height and weight percentiles, immunizations, referrals for special services outside Franklin Pediatrics and more. Because Franklin Pediatrics is your child's medical home, this record is coordinated, maintained and distributed as required.

Additionally, well-child visits are the perfect opportunities for children and parents to discuss important health and developmental concerns. For instance:

  • Is your child struggling at school?
  • Does he or she have nutritional or weight issues?
  • Does your child exhibit signs of depression or anxiety?
  • Is his or her car seat installed properly?

Come see us

At Franklin Pediatrics, the whole team wants to know your family well. We're not just here for sick visits but wish to partner with parents in caring for their kids all the way through to adulthood. For your next well-child visit, please call the office at (309) 762-0777.

By Franklin Pediatrics
August 30, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Pediatrician   Child Care  

Finding out you’re pregnant is a wonderfully exciting and whirlwind time. There are so many decisions to make as you watch your bump grow: What color should I paint the nursery? Do I want my little one to sleep with me? What do I need to childproof around the house? Of course, one of the most important things to think about is the health of your little one throughout the course of your pregnancy and once they are born. It’s never too soon to choose a pediatrician, and taking the time to find one you trust is important not just for your baby but also for you.

Once your little one is born they will be spending a lot of time with their pediatrician, so this is why it’s crucial that you find out that provides gentle, compassionate care and really takes time with you and your baby. The first two years of your baby’s life are so very important because this marks a significant developmental time for them, so it’s essential that you have a pediatrician that will be there to monitor their progress and detect any developmental delays or health problems right away.

The first pediatric visit will occur a few days after the birth. This first visit is vital, as it allows your children’s doctor to make sure everything functions as it should. This includes everything from reflexes to alertness to their hearing. Measurements are also taken to check their height and weight and to begin recording their development. Besides performing a physical exam to check the overall health of the baby this is also a time to answer any questions you might have about feeding schedules, habits, developmental milestones, etc.

After this initial visit, you should expect to bring your little one in for visits at:

  • 1 month
  • 2 months
  • 4 months
  • 6 months
  • 9 months
  • 12 months
  • 15 months
  • 18 months
  • 24 months (2 years old)
  • 30 months
  • 3 years old

Once your child turns 3 years old they will only need to visit a pediatrician once a year, unless there are any health problems or concerns in the interim. These visits are imperative for every child as they are key to preventing certain illnesses through immunizations and physical checkups, tracking their growth and development, and also providing you with answers and support to help you properly care for your little one along the way. Call a pediatrician to schedule your child’s first appointment today.