Moline, IL Pediatrician
Franklin Pediatrician
4376 7th St
Moline, IL 61265
(309) 762-0777
Pediatrician in Moline, IL Call For Finacing Options
Moline, IL Pediatrician
Franklin Pediatrician
4376 7th St
Moline, IL 61265
(309) 762-0777
Pediatrician in Moline, IL Call For Finacing Options

Posts for category: Health Condition

By Franklin Pediatrics
January 31, 2019
Category: Health Condition
Tags: ADHD  

If your child is having trouble concentrating you may be wondering if it’s ADHD.

Many symptoms of ADHD are behaviors that all children display at some point during their lifetime; therefore, it can be challenging to know whether or not your child may have ADHD or not. This is where turning to our Moline, IL, pediatricians Dr. Nafees Khan and Dr. David Bunker can shed some light on the subject. Here’s what you can do to determine whether you should bring your child in for an evaluation.

Common Symptoms of Childhood ADHD

ADHD symptoms are different for every child and factors such as age can also play a role in what signs and symptoms appear. Common symptoms and signs of ADHD:

  • Difficulty starting or completing a task (e.g. homework; chores)
  • Restlessness, fidgeting or squirming (has trouble sitting still)
  • Tends to forget or misplace items like homework or textbooks
  • Blurting out, being disruptive, or having trouble waiting their turn
  • Difficulty waiting for instructions
  • Experiences careless mistakes, particularly surrounding homework
  • Rushes through assignments
  • Daydreaming or “spacing”

Again, it’s important to recognize that a lot of these signs of ADHD are also normal behaviors as long as they aren’t happening regularly and affecting your child’s schoolwork, or home or social life. If these behaviors are persistent then it’s time to turn to a children’s doctor in Moline, IL, to find out if your child might have ADHD.

Before turning to a pediatrician it’s important to monitor and pay attention to your child’s behavior over time. Keep a record of their behaviors and anything that might be disconcerting to you. It’s also important to talk to your child’s teachers to see what behaviors or habits they are exhibiting while in the classroom, as well as at lunch or recess.

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD it’s important that you get your child’s school on board with helping them better manage daily assignments and tasks to improve their academic performance. Many schools offer amazing support and resources for children with ADHD or other learning issues.

If you suspect that your child might have ADHD it’s important to get answers as soon as possible. Call Franklin Pediatrics in Moline, IL, to schedule an appointment for your little one today.

By Franklin Pediatrics
September 06, 2017
Category: Health Condition
Tags: Eczema  

It’s normal for a child to get a rash at one time or another. But one common type of rash, known as eczema, can be especially troubling. Eczema refers to many types of skin inflammation, with atopic dermatitis being one of the most common forms of eczema to develop during a baby’s first year.  

You may first notice signs that your child has eczema as early as one to four months of age, appearing as a red, raised rash usually on the face, behind the knees and in the bends of elbows. The rash is typically very itchy and with time may spread and lead to an infection. The patches can range from small and mild to extremely itchy, which may make a small child irritable.

While the exact cause of eczema is not known, the tendency to have eczema is often inherited. Allergens or irritants in the environment, such as winter weather, pollen or certain foods, can trigger the rash. For most infants and small children, eczema improves during childhood. In the meantime, however, parents should help reduce the triggers that cause eczema outbreaks and control the itch to prevent infection.

Managing Eczema

While there is no cure for eczema at this time, there is treatment. Talk to your pediatrician about ways to alleviate itching and reduce the rash. Minimizing how often a child scratches the rash is especially important as the more the child scratches, the greater the risk of infection.

To prevent flare-ups and help your child cope with eczema, parents should follow these tips:

  • With your doctor’s direction, use antihistamine to relieve itching and reduce scratching.
  • Minimize nighttime itching by having child sleep in long-sleeved clothing to prevent scratching through the night.
  • Apply cortisone creams or medication to reduce inflammation.
  • Use mild soaps during bathing and avoid frequent, hot baths, as they will dry out the child’s skin.
  • Wrap moist bandages around the affected areas of the skin before bed to soothe and rehydrate the child’s skin.
  • Avoid triggers that aggravate eczema, such as rapid changes in temperatures or seasonal allergies.

Many kids will outgrow atopic dermatitis, but it is still important to treat the condition right away to keep it from getting worse. Work with your pediatrician to find the best combination of skin care strategies and medications to ease the itch and inflammation and keep infection at bay.

By Franklin Pediatrics
February 28, 2017
Category: Health Condition
Tags: Food Allergies   Allergies  

Food AllergyEspecially during the younger years, adequate food and nutrition is vital for a child’s growth and development. But for some children, a snack or meal as simple as a peanut butter sandwich or a cup of milk can cause serious health problems. So, what’s a parent to do when they suspect their child is allergic to a certain food?

A food allergy is the abnormal response of the immune system to a food. It’s possible to be allergic to any food, but these particular foods are responsible for the majority of allergies: milk, eggs, wheat, soy, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and peanuts. Food allergies should not be confused with food intolerance, or food sensitivity, which is more common and less severe.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction typically occur within just moments to an hour after the child ingests a food. They can range from uncomfortable to life-threatening, so it’s important for parents to understand what to do if they suspect their child is having an allergic reaction to food. Symptoms will vary for each child, but the most common telltale signs include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Hives
  • Eczema
  • Trouble breathing
  • Itching or swelling of the lips, tongue, mouth or throat
  • Sneezing
  • Wheezing
  • Light-headedness or loss of consciousness

Food allergy symptoms often resemble other medical conditions, so always contact your pediatrician for a proper diagnosis. If you suspect your child has a food allergy, remove that particular food from your child’s diet immediately. If the allergic reaction is severe, seek medical care right away.

The good news is that food allergies are often outgrown during early childhood. Your pediatrician or allergist can perform tests to pinpoint and track your child's food allergies They can also work with you to modify and manage your child’s diet to ensure they are receiving adequate nutrition for growth and development without putting them at risk for additional allergic reactions.